Posts Tagged ‘new roof’

What Are My Roofing Options?

February 15, 2011

Roofing Guide

Asphalt shingles—used on an overwhelming share of the U.S. residential roofs—can be reinforced with fiberglass materials. Fiberglass-reinforced products are more durable and dominate the market.

Fiberglass shingles have a fiberglass mat, top-and-bottom layers of asphalt and mineral granules. They are available in architectural grades and a variety of colors that offer a textured appearance.

Wood shingles and shakes are typically made from cedar, redwood, and southern pine. Shingles are machine-sawn; shakes are hand-hewn and rougher looking. Their natural look is popular but brush fire concerns limit their use.

Slate is quarried and applied mostly in the northeast and comes in different colors and grades. Considered virtually indestructible, it is, however, more expensive than other roofing materials.

Synthetic roof products simulate various types of traditional roof coverings, such as slate and wood shingles and shakes. A point to consider: Although synthetic roof products may simulate the appearance of traditional roof coverings, they do not necessarily have the same properties.

All roof systems have five basic components:

Structure: the rafters and trusses that support the sheathing.

Deck/sheathing: the boards or sheet material that are fastened to the roof rafters to cover a house.

Underlayment: a sheet of asphalt-saturated material used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Roof covering: shingles, tiles, etc., that protect the sheathing from weather.

Drainage: the features of the roof system’s design, such as shape, slope, layout, etc., that affect its ability to shed water.

Flashing: sheet metal or other material laid into the various joints and valleys of a roof system to prevent water seepage.

Ventilation is Key

One of the most critical factors in roof system durability is proper ventilation. Without it, heat and moisture buildup in the attic area combine to cause rafters and sheathing to rot, roof shingles to buckle, and insulation to lose its effectiveness.

It is important never to block sources of roof ventilation, such as louvers, ridge vents, or soffit vents. Proper attic ventilation will help prevent structural damage, increase the life of the roofing material and reduce energy consumption.

In addition to the free flow of air, insulation plays a key role in proper attic ventilation. An ideal attic has:

  • A gap-free layer of insulation to protect again heat gain or loss
  • A vapor retarder under the insulation to stop moisture from rising into the attic
  • Enough vented spaces properly allow air to pass in and out freely
  • A minimum of 1 inch between the insulation and roof sheathing

Roof Enemies

Sun: Heat and ultraviolet rays cause roofing materials to deteriorate over time.

Rain: When underneath roofing, water can work its way to the deck and begin to cause rot.

Wind: High winds can lift the roof edges and force water underneath.

Condensation: The buildup of relatively warm, moisture-laden air in a poorly ventilated attic promotes decay of the wood sheathing and rafters.

Moss and algae: Moss can grow on wood shingles and shakes if they are kept moist by poor sunlight conditions or bad drainage. Once it grows, moss holds even more moisture to the roof surface, causing rot, and its roots actually work their way into the wood.

Algae also grows in damp, shaded areas on wood or asphalt shingle roof systems. Besides creating an ugly black-green stain, algae can retain moisture, causing rot and deterioration.

Trees and bushes should be trimmed away from the house to eliminate damp, shaded areas, and gutters should be kept clean to ensure good drainage. Tree branches touching the roof will scratch and gouge roofing materials as they are blown back and forth. Leaves retain moisture and cause rot.

Missing or torn shingles: No longer complete protection.

Shingle deterioration: When shingles get old and worn out, they curl, split, and lose their waterproofing effectiveness and are more easily blown off, torn, or lifted by wind gusts.

Flashing deterioration: Many apparent roof leaks really are flashing leaks around chimneys, vents, skylights, and wall/roof junctions.

How long can you expect a roof system to last?

The condition and lifespan of your roof system will depend on the type of roof system you have, the effects of the local environment. According to the American Society of Home Inspectors, asphalt shingles generally last 15 to 20 years; wood shingle/shakes, 10 to 40 years; clay/concrete tiles, 20+ years; slate, 30 to 100 years; and metal roofing, 15 to 40+ years. Most top-of-the-line roofing product manufacturers offer a variety of warranties.

When selecting a new roof, cost and durability are tops, but aesthetics and architectural style are important, too. The right roof balances these four considerations.

To discuss all of your options, contact a Minnesota roofing contractor today!

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Benefits of Reflective Roof Coatings?

December 1, 2010

What Are The Benefits of Reflective Roof Coatings?

Benefits of Reflective Roof Coatings | “Cool” Roof Systems

There are those who believe that all black or dark colored surfaces, such as asphalt pavements and exposed black roofing materials, are contributors to a “Heat Island Effect.” Much of the heat generated by absorbing the sun’s ultraviolet radiation is also transferred to the building interior.  In warm temperature areas, this increases the demand for power, as the air-conditioning systems labor to maintain a comfortable working climate.

Studies conducted around the world have long ago established the benefits of a reflective roof coating for a “cool” roof system.  The results are well documented that reflective coatings produce energy savings, a more comfortable work environment and, more importantly, a sustainable roofing solution that can prolong the life of a roofing system with proper maintenance and periodic re-coating,  eliminating the necessity for expensive roof tear-off and replacement–and adding to already overtaxed waste disposal sites.

A major benefit of reflective coatings is their ability to sustain or extend the life of the existing roof, while providing a seamless roof surface that requires no fasteners, adhesives or heat welding.  Environmentally friendly and applicator safe to use, the coating, applied at the proper thickness to a sound roof surface, may virtually eliminate the need to replace existing roof material.  The benefits of acrylic roof coatings produce cost savings for roof maintenance and energy expenses and results in significant environmental benefits as well.

Contact a Minnesota roofing contractor for a free roof inspection Or you can email us at:  info@unitedroofingmn.com

In selecting your new roof, it is important to understand your climate zone and the actual energy your home or building will save.  There are two “cool roof” calculators available online that can give good estimates of how much energy you will save.  You can find them at:

DOE Cool Roof Calculator
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs%2Bwalls/facts/CoolCalcEnergy.htm
EPA Cool Roof Calculator

http://www.roofcalc.com/RoofCalcBuildingInput.aspx

Part 1 of Selecting Your Asphalt Shingles

September 16, 2010

Selecting Your Asphalt Shingles For Minnesota Homeowners

As you start preparing to have a new asphalt shingle roof installed, it may seem to be a long and complex task.  It is important to remember how important this process is, since it will directly affect what is probably your largest single investment – your home.  In order to simplify this process, we have developed a guide to help you through the many choices to be made.  We walk you through the different styles of asphalt shingles available, and give you the easiest way to start the process.  Getting involved in each step of the process is advisable to do away with any hassles that may crop up later.

The first step in the life of your asphalt shingle roof is selecting a shingle.  At first glance, with so many different styles and colors to choose from, it may seem a little intimidating.  But when you get right down to it, there are really only four decisions to make.

1. Selecting a Shingle Style

The different styles of shingles can be divided into two basic categories: Architectural shingles and Traditional 3-Tab Design shingles.

The first type is the architectural shingle.  Their remarkable dimensional thickness and deep, blended shadow bands simulate the appearance of classic wood shakes, enhancing the beauty of any home.  The traditional 3-tab design shingle gets its name from the three tabs incorporated into its profile.  Always a popular choice, traditional 3-tab shingles are available in a wide variety of colors.

2. Choosing a Limited Warranty Length

Architectural and traditional fiberglass shingles also come in different weights and limited warranty period lengths.  Once you have decided on one of these styles of shingles, check with your roofing contractor to determine the choices in warranty periods offered.  Ask your roofing contractor to show you a good, better and best selection of products.

While architectural shingles may cost more than Traditional 3-Tab shingles, it is important to remember that laminated architectural asphalt shingles may last longer.  Amortized over that length of time, the difference in price between Traditional 3-Tab shingles and upscale architectural shingles is less than you might think.

  • Note: Product availability may vary per region.  Depending on location, materials, roof design, underlayment, installation, slope and other factors.

3. Choosing a Color

Now, it is time to choose a color.  Although it sounds like a simple process, it is usually the step that causes the homeowner the most difficulty.  After all, choosing a color is a very personal and subjective process.  Since everyone has a unique sense of style and taste, it is impossible to give a hard-and-fast rule on how to choose a shingle color.  One of the best ways to pick a color is to drive around your neighborhood.  Check out the different color combinations of roof, brick / siding, and trim colors that your neighbors have tried.  Make a list of the ones you like, and steer clear of the ones you don’t.

Once you have narrowed down your choices, it is important to view several full size shingle samples, or an existing roof completed with the same style and color shingles, before making a final decision.  Often overlooked, getting actual shingle samples from your contractor is the best way to see how a shingle color will look in combination with the other color elements (brick / siding, and trim color) of your home.

If you are considering new trim paint or siding, grab those samples as well, and take them outside.  Hold them out in the natural sunlight, and see how the colors interact together, and how they change under different lighting conditions.

Here are some additional questions you may want to ask yourself when selecting a shingle style

Remember that laminated architectural asphalt shingles may last longer.  Amortized over that length of time, the difference in price between Traditional 3-Tab shingles and upscale architectural shingles is less than you might think.

  • Depending on location, materials, roof design, underlayment, installation, slope and other factors.

Here are some additional questions you may want to ask yourself when selecting a shingle style.

Do I live in an area where algae discoloration is a concern?

If you live in an area where algae discoloration is a concern, some shingles feature an algae resistant system to protect against algae discoloration.  You may also want to consider selecting a dark color shingle, which is less likely to show the staining associated with algae discoloration.

Do I have a steep pitched roof?

With a steep pitched roof you can see more of the roof while standing on the ground.  To give your roof an interesting and complex texture, consider using architectural shingles.  With their multi-layer, laminated construction, architectural shingles are a perfect match for steep pitched roofs.

Do I want my home to stand out from the crowd?

If you want to give your home a more distinct and individual look, consider using architectural shingles.

4. Choosing Your Roofing Contractor

After selecting a shingle style and color, the next step is choosing a roofing contractor.  This is an important step in the process, and should not be taken lightly.  It is important to do your homework, since not all contractors are alike.  Some are more committed to their workmanship and after-sales service than others.  Some may have better-trained installers.  There may even be contractors on shaky financial ground who will not survive long enough to provide the roofer’s warranty service.  A contractor who stands behind his work typically has a good reputation in the community, and wants to keep that reputation by making sure his customers are satisfied.  Take whatever time is necessary to select the right contractor.  Having the right contractor can make a big difference.

Points to consider when assessing the qualifications of various contractors:

  • How long have they been in business?
  • Are they bonded and insured, including worker’s compensation and general liability?
  • Do they have the appropriate licenses for your community? (Ask to see written proof.)
  • Will they give you the names and phone numbers of some of their customers you may call for a reference?
  • Do they have a satisfactory record with your local Better Business Bureau?
  • Are they willing to put all agreements, promises and understandings in writing
  • Whether you need a new roof, roof replacement, or roof repair, find a reliable Minnesota Roofing Contractor to provide you with an estimate for the services you need.

Home Improvements That Still Deliver The Best Return

September 14, 2010

Updating Your Existing Space

It pays to know which upgrades will deliver the best return when you sell your home.  The annual remodeling report finds 4 basic replacements are likely your smartest choice.

Replacement projects included in the Cost vs. Value survey all cost less than $20,000 and most cost considerably less.  They instantly enhance curb appeal, boosting a home’s marketability, and they require little maintenance once installed.  A bonus: Most of these replacements qualify for a federal tax credit for energy efficiency (not included in Remodeling Magazine’s ROI calculations).

1. Replace the front door.

  • The absolute best return on the money of any of the projects surveyed — 129% of cost — is gained by replacing a beat-up front door with a $1,200 steel-shell door filled with foam insulation.
  • A new fiberglass door (more expensive, at $3,490) returns less, about 65%. (Fiberglass is the new chic building material because it’s rugged and durable, can be painted and will mimic almost any wood. Unlike wood, it doesn’t crack, warp or shrink and needs zero maintenance.)
  • Spend about $7,500 on an entire new entrance, including a widened opening, a solid-core wood door and high-end glass, new lighting and better locks, and you’ll recoup 69%, on average.

2. Replace home siding

  • Replacing old siding with a durable fiber-cement product ($13,287) recoups about 84% at resale.
  • Use vinyl siding ($10,607) to get an 80% return.
  • Foam-backed vinyl ($13,022) costs more and earns back less — roughly 79% — but it is much more efficient at insulating a home.

3. Replace windows. Three of the four window-replacement projects considered in the survey pay back about 77%:

  • Wood-trimmed windows ($11,700).
  • Lower-end vinyl windows ($10,728).
  • Windows trimmed in higher-end vinyl ($13,862).
  • The fourth project, higher-end wood-replacement windows ($17,816), has a return of about 72%. Fiberglass windows weren’t included in the study.

4. Replace the roofing: Spend $19,731 on new fiberglass asphalt shingles and you’re likely to recoup about 67% of the cost.

  • A higher-end roof replacement using standing-seam metal ($37,359) pays back about 61% of the cost, agents told the survey.

Contact an Experienced Home Remodeling Contractor in Minnesota for your next remodeling project!

Source: realestatemsn.com
Remodeling Magazine: http://www.remodeling.hw.net/2009/costvsvalue

What Type Of Material Is Best For Your Home Roof Comparisons

September 9, 2010

Are You Thinking About A New Roof?

Wondering what type of material might be best for your home?

There are many types of roofing materials—some of which are brand new with a range of plusses and negatives.  You can re-roof with the same type of roofing material that you currently have or investigate alternatives.  Some materials are environmentally friendly and some are long lasting or low maintenance.  And who doesn’t love low maintenance?

Before making your choice, consider the life-cycle cost of your roofing material.  Some materials, though much more expensive, require less maintenance and have a longer life expectancy than others.  An asphalt composition roof might last just 20 years whereas a metal roof might last more than 50.  Consider both the current and potential value of your home, and its age when calculating whether a roofing material is actually “too expensive.”  It might just be more cost-effective in the long run.

The following table describes some of the roofing choices available.

Roof Type House Style Advantages Disadvantages

Composition (asphalt shingles)

Can be used on any house from contemporary to historic.  False thatched roof with the wrapped roof edge on 1920s Tudor style.

  • inexpensive
  • ranges from low-cost 3-tab shingle to architectural shingles with extra durability and style
  • many colors, types, and manufacturers
  • suitable for most residential applications
  • easy to repair
  • fire resistant
  • relatively short life-span (15–30 years)
  • scars easily when hot
  • subject to mildew and moss
  • environmentally unfriendly
Wood shingles or shakes

Bungalows, ranch, contemporary, cottage, historic

  • natural look weathering to a soft grey
  • offers some insulation value
  • blends in with the environment
  • easy to repair or replace
  • long lasting if maintained (30–50 years)
  • expensive
  • usually requires professional installation
  • high maintenance
  • tends to rot, split, mold, and mildew
  • poor fire rating unless pressure treated
Metal (steel, aluminum, tin, copper)

Bungalows, ranch, contemporary, cottage, historic (virtually all)

  • available in different looks including cedar shingles, slate, or standing seam
  • many colors
  • light weight
  • durable
  • long life span (at least 50 years)
  • low maintenance
  • can be installed over existing roofs
  • excellent performance in high wind, hail and rain
  • environmentally friendly
  • may be difficult to install
  • can be expensive
  • may need periodic painting
Tile (concrete, clay)

Mediterranean, Italian, French Eclectic, Spanish Eclectic, Beaux Arts, Mission, and Prairie. May also be attractive on some contemporary or ranch style homes.

  • non-combustible
  • many colors and styles
  • attractive
  • fireproof
  • easy to maintain
  • extremely durable when maintained
  • expensive
  • heavy
  • used primarily in new buildings because of weight and structural requirements
  • installation and repairs can be tricky
  • fragile; walking on roof may break tiles
Slate

Colonial, French, Italianate, Exotic Revivals, Chateauesque, Beaux Arts

  • beautiful, distinctive appearance
  • fireproof
  • long life span
  • low maintenance
  • very expensive
  • requires specialized installation
  • heavy
  • fragile
  • high maintenance
Concrete (fiber reinforced)

Virtually any style of home

  • many colors and styles including shakes, tile, and stone
  • relatively lightweight
  • fire and insect resistant; meet many of the more restrictive fire codes
  • low maintenance
  • extremely durable
  • resource efficient
  • can be expensive
  • uneven quality among products
Hot mopped asphalt with decorative stone

Flat roofed California-style modern

  • inexpensive
  • easy to repair
  • stinks
  • health risk to installers
  • fumes promote smog
Engineered rubber/plastic

Virtually any style of home

  • about 1/3 the weight of slate
  • long lasting (30–50 years)
  • cost effective
  • attractive
  • available in a large range of styles and colors with more appearing constantly
  • made of reclaimed materials
  • new to market
Eco-roofs

Flat to moderately sloped roofs.

  • Environmentally friendly; filters rainwater through a roof system of vegetation and soil
  • Low maintenance; can extend the life of the roof membrane substantially
  • Provides insulation to even out climate variations; in particular, keeps houses cooler in summer
  • Attractive
  • initially expensive
  • unconventional in US, though used more than 30 years in Europe

Think about your choices , then call your local roofing contractor to help you make the best decision for home and budget.

Tornado Hits Albert Lea Minnesota

June 18, 2010

Roof Repairs, Roof Tearoffs, and Roof Replacements For Minnesota Homeowners

The tornadoes that formed in the sky above Minnesota Thursday PM were Kansas-size twisters, in some cases nearly 1/2 mile wide, large, long-lasting, violent tornadoes, more common in Oklahoma and Missouri than the Gopher State.  A few were multi-vortex (wedge) tornadoes, so big and fat they didn’t even resemble typical tornado funnels.  A multi-vortex tornado is composed of 3-8 mini-tornadoes, all rotating around a common center.  If one of those violent vortexes passes overhead total damage is all but insured.  This accounts for crazy stories: one home flattened, while the home across the street suffers only minor damage.  To see the video of the tornado that hit near Albert Lea click here.

Roof Repair

We all know how Minnesota weather can turn nasty without notice.  Spring storms are especially troublesome and we often are in need of minor to major roof repair.  Repairing a roof is the process where an existing roofing system has suffered damage, or aged or additions and adjustments are made to it.  

Re-Roofing – Tear off and Recovers

Re-roofing is the process of installing a new roof when a roofing system fails.  Roofing system failures can be caused by a number of factors, including age, severe weather, poor workmanship, defective materials, improper specification of a roofing system, abuse and failure to maintain the roof properly.

Roof Maintenance

Maintenance involves the physical inspection of an existing roofing system to determine its current condition, detect weakness and failures and identify any potential future problems.   Through a program of regularly scheduled annual or semiannual roof inspections, homeowners can protect their roofing investments by seeking to identify damage in its early stages.   Early detection of leaks and roof system failures make it possible to repair and extend the life of a roof system, which is significantly less expensive and time consuming than replacing an entire roof.

If your property has been affected by storm damage (hail or wind) or if you are wondering if your property has been damaged by a recent Minnesota hail or wind storm, contact your local roofing contractor.  It is crucial that you find a credible contractor that is trained in storm damage insurance negotiation.

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All About Roof Styles

May 13, 2010

Roof Styles

The roof of a home or building is the main protection from the elements and its type and construction not only establishes the appeal of the home, but the overall style of the structure as well. Fortunately there are many roofing styles to choose from and is usually based on the geographic location, the architectural design and the climate in which the home is built. Some examples include:

  • Flat Roof- This roof is just as its name suggests, flat.  It might have a slight angle to allow some water runoff, but is not suitable for areas with heavy snowfall.  This type of roof is inexpensive, easy to build and uses few materials.
  • Gable Roof or Pitched Roof- This is a triangular-shaped roof, resembling the letter A.  Depending on the weather conditions of the area, these roofs can have a gradual slope or a very steep slope, allowing for rain and snow to run off easily.  Gable roofs are the most popular roofs in the United States and Europe and can allow for an additional story of space, either for additional rooms, loft or attic, or can allow for larger interior space with cathedral ceilings. These roofs are easy to build and accommodate most houses.  This roof will leave two sides of the house vulnerable to the elements.  If not installed properly, these types of roofs may not hold up as well during strong winds.
  • Salt Box Roof- This roof is similar to the gable roof except that the two sides are not the same size or sloped at the same angle.
  • Cross Gable- A gable roof that has two parts that cross.
  • Hipped- A low pitched roof.  It slopes upward from all sides of the building.  They hold up well in the wind and allow rain and snow to easily run off.  Allows for large eaves on buildings, in areas with a great deal of wind and rain, this might be a good choice.
  • Cross Hipped- Same as hipped but has two parts that cross.
  • Pyramidal- A hipped roof that forms a pyramid shape at the top.
  • Shed- Simple one sided roof, like a flat roof set at an angle to the ground.  Allows for rain and snow to run off.  Shed roofs are the least expensive roofs and are good if your budget is tight.  This roof is highest at one side of the structure and slopes down to the other.  These roofs will bring in a lot of light but have the smallest amount of protection from the elements.  Three sides of the building are exposed to sunlight.  The high side of the roof can get moisture into it.
  • Gambrel- Type of roof typically seen on very large barn shaped buildings.  Shaped similar to a bell and has several faces to make up the roofs surface.  Can be thought of as a flattened gable roof.
  • Mansard- Also called a French Gabled Roof.  This roof has a flat top, where the gabled roof comes to a point and has a unique bell style shape.  This is the focal point of French chateaus style architecture.

There is a wide variety of roofs to choose from.  A professional roofing contractor can help you choose the right roof that will fit the style and weather needs of your home, as well as your budget.

What Are The Benefits of Reflective Roof Coatings?

December 1, 2009

Benefits of Reflective Roof Coatings / “Cool” Roof Systems

There are those who believe that all black or dark colored surfaces, such as asphalt pavements and exposed black roofing materials, are contributors to a “Heat Island Effect.” Much of the heat generated by absorbing the sun’s ultraviolet radiation is also transferred to the building interior.  In warm temperature areas, this increases the demand for power, as the air-conditioning systems labor to maintain a comfortable working climate.

Studies conducted around the world have long ago established the benefits of a reflective roof coating for a “cool” roof system.  The results are well documented that reflective coatings produce energy savings, a more comfortable work environment and, more importantly, a sustainable roofing solution that can prolong the life of a roofing system with proper maintenance and periodic re-coating,  eliminating the necessity for expensive roof tear-off and replacement–and adding to already overtaxed waste disposal sites.

A major benefit of reflective coatings is their ability to sustain or extend the life of the existing roof, while providing a seamless roof surface that requires no fasteners, adhesives or heat welding.  Environmentally friendly and applicator safe to use, the coating, applied at the proper thickness to a sound roof surface, may virtually eliminate the need to replace existing roof material.  The benefits of acrylic roof coatings produce cost savings for roof maintenance and energy expenses and results in significant environmental benefits as well.

We hope you will consider United Roofing & Remodeling for your next project-and see what 20 years of experience and dedication have to offer. 

Contact us for a Free Quote and a free roof inspection at 612-617-1717.
Or you can email us at:  info@unitedroofingmn.com

In selecting your new roof, it is important to understand your climate zone and the actual energy your home or building will save.  There are two “cool roof” calculators available online that can give good estimates of how much energy you will save.  You can find them at:

DOE Cool Roof Calculator
http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs%2Bwalls/facts/CoolCalcEnergy.htm
EPA Cool Roof Calculator

http://www.roofcalc.com/RoofCalcBuildingInput.aspx

Because Choosing A New Roof Is A Big Decision…

November 17, 2009

There Is United Roofing & Remodeling In Minnesota

Which Roof Is Best For You?

Choosing a new roof is a big decision.  It can be one of the biggest expenses encountered by homeowners.  It is also one of the most important decisions to make as well.  Your roof keeps the weather out of your house and away from your family and possessions.  It truly is one of the most important parts of your home.

There are many great choices for roof coverings.  Here are some of the most popular choices:

Asphalt Shingles: The most popular choice of roof coverings.  Even with increases in asphalt prices the past couple of years, asphalt and fiberglass based shingles are still your most economical roof covering.  30 year architectural or laminated shingles are a great choice.  Heavy weight asphalt shingles are also available in many styles and colors with 50 year or lifetime warranties.

Metal: Metal roofs are gaining in popularity.  Standing seam metal roofs are a classic look and style.  Corrugated panels are also available as an economical alternative.  Metal shingles or metal panels stamped and covered with granules to look like shingles, slate, terra cotta and shake are also becoming more available.  Most metal roof coverings are 100% recyclable.

Slate: Slate is a classic material that can last 100 years or more depending on the slate.  It is a heavy material and your roof needs to be designed to support the weight.  With a well designed roof and deck, a slate roof will last well into the next generation or two and look great.

Wood Shake: Another classic style, but it does not have the longevity of other materials.  If installed improperly and with low quality shakes, it may need replacement within 10 to 15 years.  Do you research and choose your contractor wisely when installing a shake roof.

Concrete Tiles: Tiles can come in terra cotta style tiles and flat tiles that look like slate and shakes.  Very durable and heavy like natural slate.  You will need to take the same precautions to make sure your roof can support the material.

Whatever your roofing your house needs, United Roofing & Remodeling is your all seasons roofing contractors for residential and commercial properties in Minnesota.  Our skilled roofing experts stay up to date on all of the latest advancements in technology so we can always offer you the most cutting edge materials and techniques to get the job done right.

Contact United Roofing & Remodeling today for all your roofing needs at 612-617-1717

Storm Damage and Restoration Services From A Minnesota Roofing Contractor

October 29, 2009

Regular Roof Inspections Can Save You Money In Costly Repairs

Numerous homes are damaged by hail and wind every year.  Also, many homeowners are unaware of damage to their property.  This damage might reduce the value of their homes.  For example, a roof damaged by hail can result in interior leaks that you may not even know about until it is too late.

If you are like most homeowners, the thought of going through the process of working with an insurance adjuster, and then finding a contractor to repair the damage can be overwhelming.  From a general lack of knowledge about how to file a claim, to which materials are best suited for your needs, many homeowners fail to receive the benefits they have coming to them.

United Roofing will provide you with a free home inspection, and if you have storm damage, we will assist you with your insurance claim ~ from start to finish.

We will manage the entire insurance process for you.  We are experts because we do it for our clients every day.  It allows us to keep your job moving quickly, while taking the burden off you.

Contact United Roofing & Remodeling today to schedule your next roofing inspection at 612-617-1717
Or Request a Quote online

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